People often ask me what I am most proud of when it comes to Cincinnati State. I am most proud of the collaborative spirit that has been achieved across the college among our wonderful faculty, staff and students, and with employers and our partners in education, economic development and communities.

These relationships are key to our ability as an institution, in a quickly changing world, to address a wide range of needs and challenges.

At a recent luncheon that included local government officials, employers and economic development officials, it was made very clear how important Cincinnati State is when it comes to attracting and retaining employers in Greater Cincinnati. Cincinnati State has the unique ability to quickly develop targeted training that results in a highly competitive workforce. We are especially proud that 85 percent of our graduates stay and work in Greater Cincinnati.

Our FAA-certified aviation maintenance program at our Harrison campus is a prime example. It is playing a key role in the redevelopment of our Greater Cincinnati Northern Kentucky International Airport. The giant hub that Amazon Prime Air is creating at CVG is expected to result in 2,900 jobs. But it would not be possible without the skilled aviation maintenance technicians that Cincinnati State produces who keep the planes safely flying.

Cincinnati State provides highly skilled personnel in many local industries, including health care, manufacturing, energy, culinary, construction, and others. Just recently, Cincinnati State’s Landscape Horticulture students came in fourth place in national competition, beating out some of the best university programs in the country. This happened because our diverse team of students not only had great skills but also displayed the grit and determination so common among community college students.

Cincinnati State is also collaborating with local high schools to help families throughout the region save thousands of dollars on college expenses through the College Credit Plus program. The students complete courses such as English Composition, College Algebra and History, fulfilling high school and college requirements at the same time. More than 2,300 area high school students participated in the program this year through Cincinnati State. Nine of these students earned enough credits to be awarded an associate’s degree along with their high school diploma.

While Cincinnati State focuses on education, it also helps students and others in the community meet basic needs such as a lack of food.

A couple of years ago, a few employees noted that some students at Cincinnati State, like more and more college students across the country, were facing food shortages. The employees suggested we start a food pantry that is now fully operational because employees and students have volunteered their time. And earlier this year, our Midwest Culinary Institute worked with chefs from throughout the region to provide meals for hundreds of furloughed federal workers, many who were struggling to make ends meet.

These are just a few of many examples. We are so pleased to be a part of this wonderful community that is Greater Cincinnati and look forward to continuing to advance the educational, economic and social value of our region and state.


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