Cory and Krystle Gaiser founded Westside Market with the goal of shopping local. The couple, who are Michigan natives, own a beekeeping company, Gaiser Bee Co. Having lived in New York, Michigan and St. Martin, the Gaisers moved to Cincinnati to raise a family. In Monfort Heights, they have an 8.5-acre honey farm, which sparked Westside Market. Located at the parking lot next to NYPD Pizza in Cheviot, the small business pop-up market takes place on the first Saturday of every month May-September from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. We spoke with Krystle Gaiser to learn more.

What is your involvement in the Westside Market?

I am the coordinator for the market. I make sure that that the vendors we have in the market are good quality vendors.

What takes place at the Westside Market?

Everything. Our market is a monthly small business pop-up market. We provide an outlet for small business who are just getting started to present their products and their brand to the West Side because there isn’t anything like that over there. It allows people from all over to go shopping from local businesses.

Is there anything that you’re doing differently with the Westside Market this month?

The whole point of the market is to have something fresh and fun for everybody. Something we do different every month are the activities we do in the morning. Westside Fitness is exercise that is seen in a different perspective. Every month we have different farm animals. That’s something we wanted that separated us.

Why should people attend the Westside Market?

We want to create an area for local businesses to sell their stuff. We’re wrongfully labeled a farmers market—we’re a small business pop-up market. We’re putting money back into the economy because you’re buying tea from a guy that lives a half a mile from the market that lives in Westwood. You’re spending money on him and his business. It all circles back and goes back into our neighborhood. It can boost our economy.

What was the goal in creating Westside Market?

When we moved here, we have a [honey] store. We had contacted the zoning commissioner about doing [a market]. A couple months had gone by and just to make sure I had everything covered legally, we called him again. He said we couldn’t do it—it was against the law. Within 20 minutes of us deciding we weren’t going to do it anymore, one of the city council members from Cheviot came up to us at an event. He said he would love to have it in downtown Cheviot. Our mission was never to do this, it just came about. With our experience of doing markets already, it was meant to be.

Why Cheviot?

We wanted to get people to come into Cheviot and spend money and buy from local people that live in Cheviot and Westwood. A lot of people focus on OTR, but there’s a lot of great people in the West Side. It would be nice to develop this area.


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